Physical therapy meets pilates

Whether you’re treating an injury or just keeping healthy and strong, Kelly says Pilates is a great low-impact exercise that can be tailored to work for anyone. And she’s not the only PT who’s turning to this popular fitness practice.
311 Pilates
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“Everyone can benefit from doing Pilates,” says Catherine Kelly, a physical therapist at PRO Physical Therapy in Randolph (973.895.9925, proptnj.com) who uses the method with her patients. “Pilates puts a lot of focus on core strengthening, and that’s the foundation for everything else: Once the core is strong, many orthopedic problems can be solved.” Whether you’re treating an injury or just keeping healthy and strong, Kelly says Pilates is a great low-impact exercise that can be tailored to work for anyone. And she’s not the only PT who’s turning to this popular fitness practice. According to Jennifer Gamboa, a physical therapist and spokesperson for the American Physical Therapy Association, “in the last 10 years, the popularity of incorporating Pilates moves into physical therapy practices has really grown. It’s such a good match to help clients train their abs and protect their lower backs.”

  • Want to get started? Kelly suggests the Scoop move to increase your
  • core strength and alleviate lower back or hip pain:
  • Lie flat on your back with both knees bent and your feet flat on the ground, knees and feet in line with your hips.
  • Place the palm of your hand underneath your lower back.
  • Tighten your abs and gently push your back down toward your hand, doing a small pelvic tilt movement.
  • Hold for 10 seconds; breathe deeply and evenly.
  • Relax and release for 30 seconds, then repeat 7‑8 times.
  • Do it daily for best results.
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